Month: April 2017

Michigan Archaeological Society Meeting, 4 May 2017

The May meeting of the Saginaw Valley Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society will be held 4 May 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Castle Museum. This will likely be the final meeting before the summer break, so you won’t want to miss it! Chapter member Don Simons will be the featured speaker. He will discuss the prehistoric use of Flint Ridge, a colorful type of flint/chert (stone) found in central Ohio and widely used across the region. In the Saginaw Valley, Flint Ridge is found most frequently, though not exclusively, on sites from the Early and Middle Woodland time periods. Here is an example of a few random  Flint Ridge artifacts from the Saginaw Valley:

Early and Middle Woodland Flint Ridge Artifacts from Saginaw County.

As always, the public is invited and encouraged to attend the meeting…it’s FREE! There will be artifacts made of Flint Ridge on display at the meeting. If you have artifacts that may be made of Flint Ridge, please bring them to show the group!

The official announcement from the Saginaw Valley Chapter is copied below.

 

Saginaw Valley Chapter
Thursday, May 4, 2017

7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m., in the Morley Room of the Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, 500 Federal Avenue, Saginaw, Michigan 48607.

We will have a short business meeting before the program.

Don Simons will present an overview of Flint Ridge artifacts and related subjects from sites in the Saginaw Valley to the bedrock mines in southern Ohio.

Flint Ridge chert is the state gemstone of Ohio. For Thousands of years it’s exceptional quality as a stone tool material and colorful beauty made it a major item which served in many ways the needs of the ancient cultures of the Midwest and beyond.

Bring in your Flint Ridge artifacts for display to the chapter members.

More from the lab…

The piles are getting smaller!

The Castle Museum Archaeology lab crew (Jana, Nick, Rachel, and Roxanne) had a productive week processing artifacts from last year’s excavations at the Steltzriede Farm site. Here is a bit of their handiwork…

Freshly washed artifacts and faunal remains from the 19th century midden at the Steltzriede Farm site.

The 19th century midden area at Steltzriede produced a number of large mammal bone fragments and some smaller items including a few fish bones and even some egg shell fragments! Many of the bone fragments show butchery marks and a few show gnaw marks – likely from the family dog(s). This snapshot also shows a couple of ceramic sherds, a cinder, a brick fragment, and a piece of a white clay smoking pipe… enough variety to keep any historically-minded archaeologist happy!

A Quick Update from the Archaeology Lab…

Even as we begin to gear up for the 2017 field season, lab work is still moving along full speed ahead! Over the past few weeks we’ve had a reunion of sorts with the reappearance of long-lost volunteers Nick and Jana. They, along with two relative newcomers to the lab, Rachel and Roxanne, have been busy sorting and washing last year’s finds from the Steltzriede farm site. Much remains to be done, but the piles are definitely getting smaller!

Nick and Jana hard at work.

Michigan Archaeological Society Meeting Thursday, 6 April 2017

The Saginaw Valley Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society will hold their monthly meeting here at the Castle Museum on Thursday, 6 April 2017. Don Simons will give a presentation on Iroquois ceramic technology and will highlight several examples of Iroquois artifacts from Michigan. Don always presents an interesting and informative program, so this is one you will not want to miss! As always, visitors are welcome and encouraged to attend the meetings. The official announcement from the SVC is copied below.

 

Saginaw Valley Chapter

April Meeting
Thursday, April 6, 2017
7:00 p.m., Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, 500 Federal Ave., Saginaw, MI 48607.
 
Don Simons, will present a photos showing ceramic technology featuring “The last Iroquois potter,” followed by several Michigan finds of diagnostic Iroquois ceramic artifacts and a revisit to material from Sanilac County found by Theresa Breza. During the early Euro-American settlement period the Iroquois were a major cultural group located in the general area of Lake Ontario, especially New York and Pennsylvania. Historic records indicate a series of expeditions to the west during periods of warfare. Was Michigan one of those destinations?  Archaeological researchers may find the answer.