Month: November 2014

Michigan Archaeological Society Meeting – Thursday, 4 December 2014

The Saginaw Valley Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society will hold its monthly meeting here at the Castle Museum on Thursday, 4 December 2014 at 7:00 PM. Come join us for our annual potluck and what is certain to be an interesting program. Visitors are always welcome! The meeting notice is copied below.

 

Saginaw Valley chapter December meeting notice
Michigan’s Fur Trade:1608-1819

Date: Thursday, December 4, 2014
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, 500 Federal Ave,. Saginaw, MI 48607
Join Kyle Bagnall, Chippewa Nature Center’s Manager of Historical Programs, as he traces fur trading activity in the Saginaw valley back to the 17th Century. we’ll investigate more than 200 turbulent years as French, British and American traders vied for the rich resources of this region. You’ll also hear a story from Kyle’s own family tree, as young Archibald McMillan was captured at Detroit by Chippewa warriors in 1814 and brought to Saginaw, followed closely by a posse led by Governor Cass. Step back in time to a turbulent era which shaped our state and nation.

The December chapter meeting will include our annual potluck.

Advertisements

Michigan Archaeological Society Meeting Thursday, 6 November 2014

The Saginaw Valley Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society will hold its monthly meeting here at the Castle Museum on Thursday, 6 November 2014 at 7:00 PM. Come join us for what should prove to be an interesting program. Visitors are always welcome! The official meeting notice is copied below.

 

Saginaw Valley Chapter
November chapter meeting notice
Date: Thursday, November 6, 2014

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Location: Castle Museum of Saginaw County History, 500 Federal Ave,. Saginaw, MI 48607
In October, 2014, after reading the book…”Treasure in a Cornfield” by Greg Hawley, Don and Phyllis Simons visited the STEAMBOAT ARABIA MUSEUM in Kansas City, Missouri on their trip to Colorado. Late in the day on September 5, 1856, heading upstream from Kansas City the Arabia hit a submerged tree trunk and began to sink. The 130 passengers fled safely to shore and the 171 foot ship and over 200 tons of trade goods and general store merchandise went to the bottom. Soon the strong currents undercut the hull and the ship went deeper into the bottom. More floating trees tore off the superstructure and in one week it was out of sight. Over the years the river channel moved and the ship was buried for 132 years; until, beginning in 1988, four men and their families retrieved the entire contents and parts of the ship from 35 to 45 feet below the surface of a cornfield. Undertaking the preservation and to share the rich inventory of the Arabia the group decided to create a museum funded entirely with private money.

Located in the old riverfront area the museum exhibits the peerless display of over 2 million items of merchandise and ship artifacts. The Simons spent 5 hours exploring the unique inventory and purchased a professional quality DVD which tells the story of the return of “The Great White Arabia”.

The DVD and Simons photos showing a range of displays will be shown and described at the Saginaw Chapter Program.

Don Simons.